Use your Imagination

Although we are living in a sad moment, imagination helps me to endure the pandemic and isolation. Being at home, I imagined places, cities, beaches, river banks, isles, little towns in the mountains, all kind of landscapes I could draw. Drawing those paradises helped m...

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Feeling Vulnerable

When grieving, it feels like you are walking around without skin, everything is extra sensitive. When the world feels too much I go to a quiet spot and escape into a book....

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Getting to Know Myself

I comfort myself by… I find hope in… My friends give me…...

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Create and Reflect

Find an old picture of a memory with a person that has died. Use any materials you have (pencil, paints, clay, etc) to recreate this moment with this person. Revisit this memory by sitting still and listening to the conversations in your head that you might be hav...

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Self Affirmations

Whenever you are feeling blue, use self affirmations to remind yourself how amazing you truly are. 1) Create a relaxing environment for yourself. Sip your favorite tea, light a candle, put on your favorite soothing song, whatever helps you to relax. 2) Repeat the...

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In the Grip of Sadness

Grief can feel like you are being crushed. You may look okay, but deep down you may feel like you can’t escape your own grasp of sadness. It’s easy to lose hope and look for negatives when you are sad however that grip of sadness can only remain with you for as long...

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The Power of Playlists

Music has the ability to help us feel our emotions without much thought or effort. It meets us where we are. Make a playlist of comforting, familiar songs. If the list is too overwhelming, focus on one genre or mood. Try to reserve 15 minutes to an hour each day to s...

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The Hardest Thing

If I could say one thing to the person who died, I would… The hardest thing about life without this person is…....

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Hugs

Sometimes nobody else is around, or there's nobody to turn to for a hug. Maybe your person who died is the one who gave the best hugs, or even the only one who hugged you. Sometimes you just have to give yourself a hug. It can be hard, but you have to stand up for yours...

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You Decide

What parts of your grief do you want your friends to know about? How about your family? What do you feel comfortable sharing with others about your grief feelings?...

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Look to Nature as Your Guide

Release. Letting go is a natural process of nature. The leaves of trees fall as they turn into gold and drift lighter and lighter, drifting in the wind. Try to be like that. Feel yourself floating as you let your feelings float and travel away....

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The Essence of Incense

They say that smell is the strongest sense we have especially when it is attached to a memory. In India, I light up incense sticks that remind me of my religious grandmother doing pujas. It almost feels like she is still with me. Revisit the smells that remind you...

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Tiempo Para Sanar/ Time to Heal

No estas exagerando, es algo que te duele y esta bien que necesites tiempo para sanar. ¡Tómate tu tiempo, pero no demores; hay mucho por hacer! You are not exaggerating, it is something that hurts and it is okay that you need time to heal. Take your time,...

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Music and Grief

In grief, time feels like the enemy. Making music helped me find a better relationship with time when feeling difficult emotions. Even if you have not played in a long time, there is no bad time to get back into music. You are never too late. If you do not play an in...

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Connecting through Letter Writing

When you've lost someone, it can be very hard to ground yourself and accept that they're really gone. While it's absolutely fine to cry over someone you've lost, overdoing it isn't healthy. A great way of putting your emotions into something constructive is to writ...

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I Wish

I wish......

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Heartography – A Map of Your Heart

Gather paper, markers or pencils. This can also be done with collage materials. Make sure you have colors and images that remind you of your loved one(s). Make a map of your heart. Where is your grief located? Express the physical features of your grief. How is it diffe...

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What do you Need?

Find a space you feel the most comfort in, whether it’s alone or with a loved one. Lie down on your back, close your eyes, and slowly breathe in and out, four times each. Focus on memory. Take yourself as far back as your mind allows, to childhood. What do you see? He...

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A Simple Exercise

Pretend a newspaper reporter is interviewing you to learn about grief and loss and your job is to teach them. What would you want them to know about what it’s like to be you since your loved one died?...

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Where do you feel most at home?

Where do you feel most at home? Try to remember the feeling of falling asleep in unguarded comfort, in complete connection with your surroundings. Losing someone can make you lose touch with yourself, but within you exists an immovable core - deeper than the pain and gr...

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